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20121116
20121116
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
to figure out the fiscal cliff. is speaker boehner ready to make a deal anytime soon? >>> plus, major news for big business. the justice department hits bp with the biggest criminal penalty ever assessed on a corporation for the 2010 gulf oil spill. >>> and so much for the ideas that twinkies last forever. bankruptcy breaks a big-time baker. >>> good morning from washington. it's friday, november 16, 2012. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke russert in for chuck todd who hasn't worked hard enough at all this entire election campaign, he's now going to asia to cover the president's trip. former cia director david petraeus will testify in the benghazi attacks before the senate intelligence committee. he just wrapped up testifying on the house side. petraeus' questioning comes as he now finds himself under investigation by the agency he once led. acting director michael morell has ordered the inspector general to investigate whether he used agency resources including security details, private jets, and special accommodations to facilitate his affair with paula broadwell. officials say the c
was that john boehner was re-elected as speaker by this republican conference, and they knew that boehner was going to be a dealmaker with the president. so even the hard liners may have read the election returns, and i think even the hard liners don't be responsible for a tax increase. >> not only boehner, even mcconnell. let me show you this, michelle. mcconnell and boehner had a different kind of sound, different tone today after the meeting. watch this. >> obviously the president won re-election. the republicans were basically unable to get any seats in the senate. more people voted for democrats in the house than republicans. why do you have any leverage whatsoever? >> there's a republican majority here in the house. the american people re-elected the republican majority. >> it's important to remember that in this case, the voters also re-elected a republican-controlled house last week. the fact is the government is organized no differently today than it was after the republican wave of 2010. >> now, listen to what they had to say today. >> tomorrow is speaker boehner's birthday. so
house listen to the principles themselves, the president speaker boehner talk about these issues, i would rather be here because this is where so much of the same conversation is going to be taking place, and i get the opportunity today to talk to many of those principles directly involved in those negotiations, what's going to play out of the next couple months. it's a critical time in the country's fiscal history right now, tough decisions to be made. and again, honored. glad somebody people are watching as well over the internet and elsewhere. so we are going to begin some additional conversations here right now. i'm going to be talking about with members of congress but also to erskine bowles and alan simpson there. will he talk with some top economist about some of the choices facing those policymakers, but right now we are joined by one of the principals in the conversation to take place over at the white house in just about an hour or so, and that is gene sperling, the director of the national economic council. so i will invite him out there on the stage. so if gene sperling
-free from anywhere. >> caller: why is he talking to speaker boehner. wasn't he tried to get everybody paid off. >> stephanie: from the tobacco companies. >> caller: from the cigarette companies, i mean for years. i've watched politics for years and i mean it was always like a joke two and three years ago always drunk all the time. >> well, yeah. >> caller: you know, a political joke. i've heard people say that. i just want to make a comment. i was watching david schuster the last show, and i can't--i just want to make a comment because i've watched him for years, too. my friend have sisters in college, and i guess he's really popular in dorms. >> stephanie: he's dreamy. >> caller: in dorm rooms. people have pictures of him in their dorm rooms. >> stephanie: really? i can't wait to tease him about that. >> caller: politics, i'm just a housewife, and i hear stories about college but we're not there. >> stephanie: he's like a political geek liker beat. >> like shawn cassidy of the political world. >> caller: they were talking about religion on the last show, and i just wanted to make a comme
of those things need to be in play. when john boehner talks about raising revenue he's willing to do that if it only comes in the form of tax reform, not raising tax rates, but actually lore erring tax rates, closing loopholes, broadening the base and you will get more money coming into the treasury. the other part of the equation that is so important which has not been part of the public conversation is cutting spending, not just slowing the rate of growth but actually cutting spending to try to get this deficit under control. i know the republicans don't control the narrative on this but i want to hear more from them on that side of the equation. jon: julie our nodding your head you must agree. >> i think both sides need to come to the table. enough already with these sort of, you know, showmanship, game man ship, these are people's lives that are at stake in this economy. monica is right in that the president does control the upper hand at this point. if nothing is done all the bush tax rates will expire. you have exit polling coming out of the recent election saying two-thirds of
boehner is even interested in? >> i think it is probably something that he might consider. this is how negotiations work. congressional "fight club." they stake out their positions and sort of move closer together as they come together and actually meet and discuss this. there are couple options what they can do on the table. president signaled perhaps it doesn't have to be all about getting rates to clinton era levels. perhaps getting revenue from other places. i think that would be healthier, broader tax reform kind of deal made. i'm not sure whether they're all savvy enough to make that deal. i mean. martha: seems to me that is the major issue here. that is what john boehner was hinting at. he is suggesting that if you remove some of the loopholes that is a tax increase on the wealthy in this country. i feel like that is a message that has gotten across in perhaps a clear enough way. if you do same thing for u.s. corporations and roof move tax loopholes and don't end up in a situation where ge doesn't pay anything and small business pays through the nose. why isn't that kind of refo
john boehner and house minority leader nancy pelosi will be there and others at any moment to talk about the fiscal cliff. the president spoke to labor leaders and business executives earlier in the week. it's a busy day in washington, d.c. we'll have more on all of this we'll have more on all of this coming up. diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guid
connell, who's the senate minority leader, he's taking a tougher stand than even boehner. let's listen to both of those positions. >> let's be clear. an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson/bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house agreed to last summer during the debt ceiling talks, and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be implemented, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hikes. in other words, no cuts at all. it's a joke. a joke. >> we right away say 98% of americans are not going to see their taxes go up. 97% of small businesses are not going to see their taxes go up. if we get that in place, we are actually removing half of the fiscal cliff. half of the danger to our economy is removed by that single step. >> okay. so is it a joke, or as the democrats would say, the math isn't adding up? let's look at the issue of deficit reduction. the democrats say the -- let's say if you cut loopholes
want to take you back to the live camera positions. this is outside of the white house and john boehner taking the microphone and let's listen in. >> by significant spending cuts. and while we're going to continue to have revenue on the table, it is going to be incumbent for my colleagues to show the american people that we're serious about cutting spending and solving our fiscal dilemma. i believe that we can do this and avert the fiscal cliff that right in front of us today. >> this isn't the first time we have dealt with these issues. we feel we understand what the problem is. we felt very -- i feel very good about what we were able to talk about in there. we have a cornerstones of being able to work something out. we're both going to have to give up some of the things that we know are a problem. and so it is like when we arrive at a point where we all know something has to be done, there is no more let's do it some other time or we're going to do it now and i think there is we feel very comfortable with each other and this isn't something we're going to wait until the last day of de
and the ongoing relationship with boehner and mcconnell because he's going to have to be a different kind of leader with them. he talked about it in the press conference a bit the other day. he needs to reach out to them the way he's reached out to people on staten island and dealt with the two governors, christie and cuomo, who are two pretty demanding guys as well. and based on their public and private comments have been very happy with the president's leadership and his government. >> i just wonder if it's fair to make a parallel when you look at the president's response to sandy which has had and continues to have just devastating effects on the economy for businesses and the reaction to the bp oil spill which seemed slow in coming because that was devastating as well to a different part of the country. >> he certainly was. he was very slow to respond to people in the gulf coast. >> in terms of appearances. >> i think things have changed, though, over the past couple years. and i suspect that, you know, even the president's closest allies will say that it was a very hard adjustment go
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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